Since my blog on City Living last month, I ventured out to the Philadelphia western suburbs to photograph a Main Line makeover for architect Jeffrey Spoelker, AIA, of JMS Architecture. Jeff started his own practice in 2009 but is now pumping up the marketing volume with a new website and bigger, better photos. That’s where I come in.

Old Is the New “New”
Interior images make you think you’re looking at a brand new house. But the exterior’s Center Hall Colonial style gives away the home’s 100-year age. The couple who live here love their charming neighborhood and its historic architecture, but found themselves “making do” in a home designed for a century-old lifestyle. Jeff’s first step was to help this atypical family rethink interior spaces to enhance the way they really live.

Top floor guest room for older children when they visit.

Top floor guest room for older children when they visit.

Empty Nest? Not Yet.
This couple’s recent re-marriage spawned a hybrid style of Brady Bunch living. The husband’s grown children have flown the coop … but come back to visit. And the wife’s younger kids still live at home. So the nest is full again … fuller even. To accommodate the needs of all parties, under-used rooms were transformed into walk-in closets, computer rooms and private baths adjoining bedrooms. The attic was refashioned as a dynamic guest room with private bath. Most spaces were made sleeker, more spacious and tailored for optimum functionality with fun accents like sliding barn doors and pebble-look shower tiles.

The unfinished attic before its transformation.

The unfinished attic before its transformation.

or interior shots, I blended multiple exposures to fully express the characteristics of reflective materials like countertops, tile, shower doors, mirrors, windows, wood grain. To highlight the interesting geometries of the attic bedroom, I shot from four different angles and digitally fused the shots to span all dimensions, from ceiling shapes to rug and side dormer windows.

6-Sided Living
In contrast with “City Living” in a rowhouse or apartment tower, most houses in the Burbs have FOUR SIDES! This house’s whopping six sides compounded the challenge of timing for optimum sunlight while factoring in patios, overhangs, porches, chimneys, dormer windows, foliage, garage and neighboring houses. Exterior images show improvements like the new gable created over the front door. The house was re-roofed and re-stuccoed with wood siding inserted here and there for a contemporary touch. A small outdoor porch was stripped off and another exposed and connected to the larger back patio.

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