wpid-gb_081222_2152.jpg

wpid-gb_081222_2152.jpg

Every interior space has its own set of scheduling restrictions. A photographer must find a balance between quality and convenience, which means choosing a time when the space still looks its absolute best while not interfering with the business of its occupants. The guidelines for scheduling the shoot can seem like a series of contradictions:

  • Shoot too close to the completion date and the construction crew may still be racing to deal with unfinished punchlist items;
  • Shoot immediately after construction and you run the risk that spaces are devoid of furniture and equipment;
  • Shoot too long after construction and you may find that high-traffic areas are already beginning to look worn.
  • Also, once the space is open for use, the shoot can prove to be an unmanageable inconvenience to a 24/7 operation.
wpid-gb_081223_2846.jpg

wpid-gb_081223_2846.jpg

There is no steadfast hard rule, and no one-size-fits-all answer. The best time for photography will be different for every project. Previous planning and discussions between the client, the occupants, and photographer are critical to getting the best interior photographs.

For example, photographing a restaurant requires scheduling a time not during service, but after the tables have all been dressed and the cleaning staff has had a chance to tend to the floors, windows, etc.

wpid-gb_081022_1750.jpg

wpid-gb_081022_1750.jpg

When Greg photographed a series of new additions to the Morristown Memorial Hospital for Buckl Architects, we had the benefit of working within a perfect time window for each phase. For this project, the ideal time to schedule the photo shoot was after construction had completed, furniture had been moved in, and most of the equipment and computers had been installed – but before those portions of the hospital opened their doors to patients.

wpid-gb_081223_2619.jpg

wpid-gb_081223_2619.jpg

The last aspect is probably the most important. People are usually glad to be accommodating during a photo shoot, but it might be inconvenient for an ICU patient to leave their room just so the photographer can set up his shot.

wpid-gb_081222_2254.jpg

wpid-gb_081222_2254.jpg

On all the projects we have worked on for Buckl Architects they have always been actively involved in the process, and have done a great job providing and styling plants for each of the spaces. Lee Tamaccio at Buckl is a kick-ass stylist.

wpid-gb_081222_2277_r.jpg

wpid-gb_081222_2277_r.jpg

Comment